What is the point of gardening?

Why garden? It’s a question that has long intrigued Georgina Reid, landscape designer, writer and gardener. “I had a side-project when I was studying, asking people why they garden,” she says. “I think I asked because I was trying to work out why I did it myself but nobody else could answer either. It was a question that stumped people.”

She stopped asking, and instead launched the online magazine The Planthunter, which explores why we garden through talking to people about their relationship with plants and the spaces they make with plants. The ideas that have come from those conversations are explored more deeply in her new book, also called The Planthunter.

David Whitworth has created a vibrant, plant-filled, mostly potted garden in Sydney.
David Whitworth has created a vibrant, plant-filled, mostly potted garden in Sydney.Credit:Daniel Shipp

With her long-term collaborator, photographer Daniel Shipp, Reid explores questions of beauty, transformation, solace and faith through the stories of 24 people in Australia, New Zealand and the US, and the gardens they have created. Actually make that present tense: the book begins with a series of aphorisms including this by garden-maker and sculptor Ian Hamilton Finlay: “A garden is not an object, but a process.”

For David Whitworth, one of the Sydney gardeners featured in the book, gardening is a process of caring. Whitworth has created a vibrant, plant-filled, mostly potted garden in what was formerly the slimy, mosquito-ridden waste space at the back of an inner-city terrace share-house. He tells Reid that he has realised he prefers to work in his garden than sit in it. “I think ‘to tend’ is my favourite verb,” he says. “It implies that you are creative, or nurturing, but almost invisibly so. It’s also aspirational. To tend is to sustain a state of caring. It is a state I’d like to aim for in more areas of my life than just gardening.”

It’s an idea that resonates with Reid. “Gardening is essentially two things,” she says “You have to care and you have to act. You can’t be a gardener and sit here and watch nature happen. Gardening is caring action, and that can be a framework for engaging with the natural world, but I’m also interested in taking that out of the garden and into the world.”

We’ve met to talk about these ideas in Wendy Whiteley’s Secret Garden in Lavender Bay, a garden that epitomises Reid’s notion of gardening as caring action. Whitley started gardening this space in search of solace, and through her actions has created a garden that offers solace to others. “It’s really a space that has a lot of someone in it, and that’s important in any garden space,” says Reid. “There’s always a story.”

[“source=TimeOFIndia”]

Gardening: Lemon Tree Borer

Image result for Gardening: Lemon Tree Borer

Ruud Kleinpaste gives us his top tips for stopping lemon tree borer.

Life’s lesson for gardeners:

Do not prune your citrus/lemons and other susceptible plants in spring, summer and early autumn, as that would allow the borer beetles an obvious place to oviposit and start the trouble all over again.

So you can’t “cut out” the borer damage in the warmer months of the year

Instead:

1) find the toilet holes with plugs of borer frass (poo/sawdust) hanging from it

2) insert a fine plastic “straw” nozzle from an insecticide can into the hole and tunnel and fog the larva to death in situ.

3) alternatively: grab a piano-wire or guitar string and poke it into the hole to spear the lemontree borer grub up its bottom, so to speak – I found the best string to use is the G-string J

There is no point in spraying your citrus tree/bush with an insecticide, as the larva is totally protected inside the branch/twig – it’ll survive

There’s perhaps some merit in covering the winter pruning cuts with some pruning sealant.

[“source=TimeOFIndia”]

Gardening: A few last-minute jobs to do outdoors before winter really sets in

IT’S almost time to batten the hatches before winter arrives. Here are a few of the last-minute jobs should you be doing…

1. Shelter vulnerable plants: My pots of geraniums (pelargoniums) are still going strong but they won’t be for much longer, so if you want to keep them for next year, find them some shelter now. Cut them back to 10cm (4in) and put pots in a light, frost-free place such as a greenhouse or a sheltered porch next to the house. If the spot isn’t completely frost-free, wrap the pots in bubble wrap to give them extra protection. Do the same with fuchsias, cutting them back before you put them under cover for winter, and hardly water them at all until growth starts again in spring.

2. Divide perennials: The ground should still be soft enough to dig up overcrowded clumps of perennials and split them, replanting the divided clumps to give them more space. This will lead to better performance in subsequent years and you’ve also increased your stock. Good subjects for division include crocosmia, rudbeckia, helenium, cranesbill geranium and catmint.

3. Trim hedges: Try to do this when the weather’s still fine. If you tidy evergreen hedges now, they will look neat until next year as they won’t put on much new growth during the cooler months. Also, trimming now may save you a bigger job in spring, when you also risk disturbing birds’ nests. Deciduous shrubs can be pruned into winter.

4. Get rid of the last of the weeds: Try to dig out any pernicious perennial weeds you see lurking, such as bindweed, couch grass and ground elder. You’ll need to dig them out completely, root and all, as if you leave any fragments of root in the soil they will come back in spring. If you have areas which have been totally invaded, consider covering the ground with sheets of black plastic, secured with bricks at each corner, which will stop the light and hopefully kill the weed in a few months.

[“source=TimeOFIndia”]

Good to Grow: Stay green year-round with greenhouses

20181104-gm-good-to-grow-greenhouse.jpg

Welp, it’s officially cold and all of my beautiful annuals have bitten the dust. I did rescue one lovely apricot hibiscus and a few adorable succulents, which are now adorning my living room.

The only color left outside seems to be coming from fall leaves and seasonal decorations. While fall colors are wonderful, I find myself already missing my lively plants.

At times like these, my mind starts drifting to thoughts of backyard greenhouses. While I haven’t quite gotten up the nerve and/or energy to make one, I have done a decent amount of research into the magical world of greenhouses and thought I’d share in the bounty of my knowledge.

First off, let’s make something clear: Greenhouses can be as simple or as complex as you want them to be. You can go all-out with custom building materials, watering systems, heating systems, vents, the whole nine yards.

You can also stop by Habitat for Humanity ReStore (one of my favorite stores for DIY projects) and pick up old windows, glass doors, spare lumber, etc., and whip something up over the weekend. I’m going to be talking about simpler, more cost-efficient methods for building and optimizing greenhouses, but know that you can go as big and as fancy as you’d like.

If you’re going to build a greenhouse, your No. 1 supply is whatever you’d like to use for glazing (the stuff that lets the light in.) Glass or plastic sheeting are the most common materials, with plastic being an excellent option if you’re on a budget. I personally prefer the look of glass, but it will cost more, unless you get an excellent deal on used windows or sheet glass.

The downside to these materials is that they are almost as good at letting heat out as they are at letting it in. This is fine during the day, since the amount of heat pouring in is more than enough to combat heat loss.

The issue arises when night rolls around. Insulation techniques like weather stripping and horticultural Bubble Wrap can help, as can building your greenhouse so that it’s broadest side is south-facing. But ultimately, come nighttime, something must be done to combat the cold.

Your other materials will be an important line of defense. Most basic greenhouses are made of wood, but materials like stone and concrete will retain more heat during the day, which will then seep back into the greenhouse overnight.

You know what else is amazing at retaining heat? Water. If you have room in your greenhouse for a barrel or two of water, they will soak up all of that delicious sunlight during the day and let it out low and slow during the night. Ain’t nature grand?

Unfortunately, water, concrete and insulation can’t help against the coldest nights in our region. That’s where heaters come in.

My favorite method is simply a solar-powered heater with a battery to store energy during the day. However, a basic space heater or stove can do the trick.

If your greenhouse is small enough, something as minor as a slow cooker full of water set to low can keep your plants happy. If you’ve insulated well and use water and light to your advantage, the heaters will only be necessary some of the time. They act more like a fail-safe, especially if you get one with a thermostat that will switch the heater off once you’ve reached about 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

[“source=TimeOFIndia”]

Spruce Up Makes Digital Interior Design Services Available For Everyone

Spruce Up is a new online interior design service that might make you rethink using one.

In recent years, a slew of online interior design startups have emerged. These services run the gamut from inexpensive virtual room curations to more complete home renovation consultations costing upwards of thousands of dollars. It’s easy to understand the appeal. Using the digital services of an experienced design professional is less expensive and more convenient than more traditional ways. It has also opened up the market to people who would otherwise just decorate themselves. However, there has been a gap for consumers looking to do a quick refresh or want a designers eye for smaller scale projects. Now, the recently launched Spruce Up is looking to take on this niche in an entirely new way.

Ending The Endless Scroll

Furnishing a room or even accessorizing one is rarely a simple process. Take a living room for example. At the very minimum, there are three to four items that need to fit and coordinate into a space. Finding good help at any brick and mortar store is challenging. Online shopping can be equally frustrating in a different way entirely. It’s easy to spend a seemingly endless amount of time looking at what’s available and the end result is often decision fatigue.

This is exactly what happened to CEO and Founder of Spruce Up Mia Lewin. She sees Spruce Up as the perfect solution for millennials who like to shop online, but don’t want to spend unnecessary time doing it. “What we need is help sorting through all our favorite brands and styles to choose the right pieces and make them our own. Spruce Up provides the perfect pairing of a high-touch, specialty boutique service and selection, within a modern digital shopping experience, personalized to each customer and their home,” she explained.

How It Works

An easy quiz yields complex results.

An easy quiz yields complex results.Spruce Up

The process of using Spruce Up is equally efficient and thorough. It starts with a style quiz where shoppers click through various pieces of furniture, decor and color swatches with an easy thumbs up or down. Results are grouped into percentages of categories such as 53% Contemporary Glamourist and 36% Vintage Industrialist.

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Then customers are matched with an expert stylist. Spruce Up has pretty high standards for their designers, all of whom already have established businesses with five to over twenty years of experience. After filling out a form to share the specifics of the project, stylists are accessible via chat. Text, photos, and links can all be sent within the interface.

The next step is what sets Spruce Up apart from their competition. It is the first of its kind to combine artificial intelligence with stylist curation. The designer uses AI behind the scenes to choose from the 20k+ products available. They streamline everything down to a personalized mini-boutique of up to twelve items. It is presented as an aesthetically pleasing mood board which includes their notes as well as full details from the retailer. Users can check out from there or if they are unsure, request to swap out up to four items.

Spruce Up has over fifty retail partners that range from well-known favorites including West Elm, Blu Dot, AllModern, Article and Interior Define to Loloi Rugs, as well as Lulu and Georgia. They also have more obscure brands such as FinnPeaks, Magisso and Ara Collective. Spruce Up says this all adds up to one trillion potential product variations for the algorithm to comb through.

The Price Is Right

A Boho chic moodboard.

A Boho chic mood board.Spruce Up

But perhaps the best part of Spruce Up that it’s essentially free. Before being matched, shoppers pay a one-time $25 styling fee, which is credited toward any item purchased within fourteen days. This makes the service incredibly appealing to those who want to use a designer but think it’s out of their reach. Spruce Up will also bring in customers who would have never considered using a designer because of the cost.

It is also likely to attract shoppers who want something very specific and realize the value of having a professional do the legwork without the cost. For example, curating a gallery wall or finding a designer dupe. Spruce Up is also useful for people who need something coordinate with a piece they already own—like a coffee table to compliment an oversized 1970’s mid-century modern vintage sofa in a studio apartment.

Behind The Scenes

A beautiful spruce up.

A beautiful spruce up.Allied8 Architects Seattle, Photograph Rafael Soldi

While Spruce Up appears to have come out of nowhere—the company’s founders and leadership have experience working with major retailers including Amazon, eBay, West Elm, Williams Sonoma, and Anthropologie. The Advisory Board members include Julie Bornstein, who was previously the COO of StitchFix, and Hilary Billings, who is a prior Board Member of Design Within Reach. In February 2018, the Seattle-based company secured $1.5M in pre-seed funding from a variety of investors including Two Sigma Ventures, Madrona Venture Group, Female Founders Fund, Maveron, and Peterson Ventures.

[“source=TimeOFIndia”]

Spruce Up Makes Digital Interior Design Services Available For Everyone

Spruce Up is a new online interior design service that might make you rethink using one.

In recent years, a slew of online interior design startups have emerged. These services run the gamut from inexpensive virtual room curations to more complete home renovation consultations costing upwards of thousands of dollars. It’s easy to understand the appeal. Using the digital services of an experienced design professional is less expensive and more convenient than more traditional ways. It has also opened up the market to people who would otherwise just decorate themselves. However, there has been a gap for consumers looking to do a quick refresh or want a designers eye for smaller scale projects. Now, the recently launched Spruce Up is looking to take on this niche in an entirely new way.

Ending The Endless Scroll

Furnishing a room or even accessorizing one is rarely a simple process. Take a living room for example. At the very minimum, there are three to four items that need to fit and coordinate into a space. Finding good help at any brick and mortar store is challenging. Online shopping can be equally frustrating in a different way entirely. It’s easy to spend a seemingly endless amount of time looking at what’s available and the end result is often decision fatigue.

This is exactly what happened to CEO and Founder of Spruce Up Mia Lewin. She sees Spruce Up as the perfect solution for millennials who like to shop online, but don’t want to spend unnecessary time doing it. “What we need is help sorting through all our favorite brands and styles to choose the right pieces and make them our own. Spruce Up provides the perfect pairing of a high-touch, specialty boutique service and selection, within a modern digital shopping experience, personalized to each customer and their home,” she explained.

How It Works

An easy quiz yields complex results.

An easy quiz yields complex results.Spruce Up

The process of using Spruce Up is equally efficient and thorough. It starts with a style quiz where shoppers click through various pieces of furniture, decor and color swatches with an easy thumbs up or down. Results are grouped into percentages of categories such as 53% Contemporary Glamourist and 36% Vintage Industrialist.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Then customers are matched with an expert stylist. Spruce Up has pretty high standards for their designers, all of whom already have established businesses with five to over twenty years of experience. After filling out a form to share the specifics of the project, stylists are accessible via chat. Text, photos, and links can all be sent within the interface.

The next step is what sets Spruce Up apart from their competition. It is the first of its kind to combine artificial intelligence with stylist curation. The designer uses AI behind the scenes to choose from the 20k+ products available. They streamline everything down to a personalized mini-boutique of up to twelve items. It is presented as an aesthetically pleasing mood board which includes their notes as well as full details from the retailer. Users can check out from there or if they are unsure, request to swap out up to four items.

Spruce Up has over fifty retail partners that range from well-known favorites including West Elm, Blu Dot, AllModern, Article and Interior Define to Loloi Rugs, as well as Lulu and Georgia. They also have more obscure brands such as FinnPeaks, Magisso and Ara Collective. Spruce Up says this all adds up to one trillion potential product variations for the algorithm to comb through.

The Price Is Right

A Boho chic moodboard.

A Boho chic mood board.Spruce Up

But perhaps the best part of Spruce Up that it’s essentially free. Before being matched, shoppers pay a one-time $25 styling fee, which is credited toward any item purchased within fourteen days. This makes the service incredibly appealing to those who want to use a designer but think it’s out of their reach. Spruce Up will also bring in customers who would have never considered using a designer because of the cost.

It is also likely to attract shoppers who want something very specific and realize the value of having a professional do the legwork without the cost. For example, curating a gallery wall or finding a designer dupe. Spruce Up is also useful for people who need something coordinate with a piece they already own—like a coffee table to compliment an oversized 1970’s mid-century modern vintage sofa in a studio apartment.

Behind The Scenes

A beautiful spruce up.

A beautiful spruce up.Allied8 Architects Seattle, Photograph Rafael Soldi

While Spruce Up appears to have come out of nowhere—the company’s founders and leadership have experience working with major retailers including Amazon, eBay, West Elm, Williams Sonoma, and Anthropologie. The Advisory Board members include Julie Bornstein, who was previously the COO of StitchFix, and Hilary Billings, who is a prior Board Member of Design Within Reach. In February 2018, the Seattle-based company secured $1.5M in pre-seed funding from a variety of investors including Two Sigma Ventures, Madrona Venture Group, Female Founders Fund, Maveron, and Peterson Ventures.

[“source=TimeOFIndia”]

Gorgeous Christmas Table Settings Inspired by 3 Top Trends

The most beautiful Christmas table settings are those that reflect your personal style, whether that’s classic and traditional, or ’70s-inspired boho. Let your holiday table setting nod to the latest trends of the moment (hello, shibori napkins), but choose a theme that matches your own home decor style, too. To help us find inspiration and make shopping for all of the details easier, we met up with Etsy’s trend expert Dayna Isom Johnson for her top three Christmas table settings for 2018. Go with the neon look for a merry and bright vibe, or opt for the laid-back style of the bohemian table setting. Then, consult the shopping guide below to find out where to buy every gorgeous item featured in the video.

Rustic Yet Refined: The Modern Farmhouse Table Setting
Christmas Table Settings, Modern Farmhouse
BlancPottery.etsy.com

Joanna Gaines may have made the modern farmhouse trend take off, but the fad isn’t stopping anytime soon. This versatile table setting can work with several home decor styles, including farmhouse and Scandi-inspired minimalism. The first key is to incorporate natural elements, Isom Johnson explains. Consider bringing in pinecones, greenery, or even natural wood slice chargers. Keep the color palette neutral so that the natural elements can really shine, then mix in a few metallic pieces, like gold flatware.

To buy: Handmade Pottery Dishes (pictured), BlancPottery.etsy.com. Set of 3 Wooden Candlesticks, BitsofImperfection.etsy.com. Rustic Wood Slice Chargers, MMESupplyHaus.etsy.com. Catch All Dish, BlancPottery.etsy.com. Natural Napkins, PCBHome.etsy.com.

2
All Is Bright: The Neon Table Setting
Christmas Table Setting, Neon
bobbyandfaith.etsy.com

To make your table merry and bright, but without going overboard, Isom Johnson suggests mixing just a few neon touches into your Christmas table setting. Bright bottle brush trees or napkins with some DayGlo details are all you need to get the look.

To buy: Ho, Ho, Ho Tea Towels, bobbyandfaith.etsy.com. Neon Heart Place Settings, RachelEmmaStudio.etsy.com. Neon Bowls, paragraphloop.etsy.com. Bottle Brush Trees, smilemercantile.etsy.com. Wood Salt & Pepper Shaker Set, ForTheHost.etsy.com. Wood Kitchen Utensil Set, ForTheHost.etsty.com.

3
Bo-Ho-Holidays: The Bohemian Table Setting
Christmas Table Setting, Boho Table
TheArtisanAbodeShop.etsy.com

The ’70s are making a resurgence, and that means that bohemian style is back. Let your Christmas table setting reflect this laid-back style by incorporating whimsical agate place cards, a dried floral centerpiece that would make any flower child proud, and shibori napkins for an updated take on tie-dye. To finish the look, mix in rattan chargers, coasters, or napkin rings.

[“source=TimeOFIndia”]

These Epic Home Trends Are Making A Comeback

1970s BEDROOM WHITE...

Few feelings compare to when you realize your favorite trends of the past come back into style, updated and better than ever. That can be said for everything from interior design to fashion and beauty—trends tend to wax and wane and evolve over time, so when you can suddenly find an even better version of your favorite styles, it’s pretty exciting. From soft, cozy shearling and sunburst mirrors to all of the rattan and wicker your heart could ever desire, these are some of the top home trends making a comeback this year.

Shearling
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Arhaus

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Lazar Chair
$599, Arhaus

One of the biggest trends this year has been shearling, sherpa, and wool (both real and faux) furniture, particularly chairs. If you’ve been waiting for all things lush and fuzzy and cozy to make a comeback, it’s here—and it’s ready for all the naps you’ll inevitably be taking, because who can stay awake on a chair like this?

Shag Rugs
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Lulu & Georgia

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Rimora Shag Rug
$305, Lulu & Georgia

You might immediately think “too 70s” when you hear the word “shag,” but shag rugs are fully back. They may not be popular in wall-to-wall carpet form like they were decades ago, but soft, shaggy area rugs with beautiful patterns like this one? They’re just about everywhere now.

Rattan and Wicker
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Made Goods

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Aurora Lounge Chair
Made Goods

You’ve probably already noticed that there’s been a huge resurgence of wicker and rattan furniture and decor this year, because you can find them everywhere from high end retailers to budget stores. But, it’s not your average rattan—this time, it’s all about the details, like the cool shape of this stunner from Made Goods.

Sunbursts
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Anthropologie

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Sunstar Mirror
$228, Anthropologie

Sunbursts are back and ready for all your mirror needs, but this time they’re a little more elegant and understated, especially in gold. And you’ll likely notice a crossover between the wicker trend and the sunburst trend—there are tons of wicker and rattan sunburst mirrors out there just waiting for you to give your home a touch of boho-glam.

Macramé
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Pottery Barn

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Jenn Macrame Wall Art
$139, Pottery Barn

Macramé wall hangings have been big on maker spaces like Etsy for a while now because it’s never really gone away, but you’ll likely be seeing a lot more of this vintage-inspired favorite at major retailers and more high-end stores. It is a great way to add texture to a room, after all.

Oversized Sofas
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West Elm

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Harmony Down Sectional
$559 and up per piece, West Elm

Sleek, chic sofas have reigned supreme for some time, but with an emphasis on comfort and having plenty of seating for guests or the whole family, stylish oversized couches are where it’s at now. Who doesn’t want a sofa they can sink right into on movie night?

Mirrored Furniture
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Restoration Hardware

BUY NOW

Strand Mirrored Desk
$1550, Restoration Hardware

Mirrored furniture is one of those trends that always seems to pop up again every few decades, and it’s definitely back now. Nightstands, desks, coffee tables—you name it, and you can find high-end and budget buys with that glam, throwback finish just about everywhere you turn.

[“source=TimeOFIndia”]

St. Thomas house tour mixes styles, eras, colours

If the retail displays haven’t put you in the holiday mood, the St. Thomas Rotary Christmas tour of homes offers to do so. The 23rd annual tour opens the doors to four homes decorated by local florists and designers Nov. 9-11. It’s a feel-good weekend of trees, tinsel and music to support many of the Rotary Club’s projects.

Start with the candlelight Friday night preview, or gather a group of friends and wend your way around Elgin County during the day. Here are 10 highlights to get the most from your tour.

St. Thomas Christmas Homes Tour, 204 Adelaide Street Port Stanley, overlooking Lake Erie on Monday October 29, 2018. Decorated tree overlooking lake Mike Hensen/The London Free Press/Postmedia Network

Variety of house styles as seasonal settings: The homes this year include a century cottage expanded into a luxurious all-year home; a ranch filled with antiques; a spacious custom-built house; and a new model home featuring many upgrades. The selection committee looks for diversity to showcase possibilities and inspire. They also included the CASO (Canada Southern) railway station where participants can relax over a cup of hot cider and see four trees done up in different styles by local designers.

Variety of decorating styles: There’s a place for every taste, from coastal teal and aquamarine, to shore and waves in blues, sandy brown and cream. The model home is a blank canvas for Berry Hill Ltd. Visitors also will want to check out the energy efficiencies of the net-zero complete home: solar panels, monitoring system and on-demand water heater. The fourth house shows how to incorporate antiques into a 21st-century house.

A first-time old-time approach: This year, one of the homeowners also is the decorator for her home. “It is totally furnished with antiques the owners bought anywhere you can buy and refinish yourself,” said tour organizer Patricia Martyn. The family room fireplace dates to the 1800s and was rescued and refurbished by the owners. Wall treatments give the illusion of vintage wallcoverings, and lights throughout the house are antique fixtures.

Use of non-traditional colours: Two houses feature cool hues, not the usual red and green. Heritage Garden Gallery will show how to be creative with a teal, coastal vibe and how to work with unique aspects of a custom house.

Themes for different rooms: One house has seven bedrooms that reflect the Mediterranean taste of previous owners and the Victorian pieces the current owner brought from their farmhouse. The colours vary too, from orange and yellow to pink. Some houses will include children’s rooms. Often, designers decorate a tree in each room to show matching themes.

Simplify the decor: Casa del Lago in Port Stanley began as a one-storey cottage in 1910, morphed into a Mediterranean villa, took on some Victorian touches, and now serves as home, studio and entertaining centre for June and Ross Ayrhart. They removed walls, opening the interior up to the panoramic view of Lake Erie. They also unified the main level by removing brick, painting the walls a soothing blue (Just Charming by Beauty Tone) and adding art and accents of sailing and ports from their travels around the world.

Bring the outside indoors: Rose Caris, creative designer for McLennan Flowers and Gifts, wanted to make the most of the lakeside setting. “The blue is unique,” said Caris. “Blue and grey are so in as colours now.” She moved the tree to the side of the window, and chose ornaments that echo sand and water and the furnishings: soft blue balls, white berries and crystal sprays, and burlap poinsettias with clusters of silver bells in the centre. She chose the burlap for its similarity to sand in texture and colour. On the mantel, a bare twig sculpture provides hanging space for clear glass balls. The mini-lights make the balls sparkle like sun on the water outside. Pine cones, crystals sprays and clusters of blue balls repeat the theme.

Open concept means co-ordinated decor: “When you have an open concept, the colours all have to blend in,” said Caris. From the dining table, to the kitchen island to the tree in the sitting room, she shows how to use the colours to unify without merely doing the same thing in each area. For example, the chandelier above the table will be adorned with crystal sprays picking up one of the elements from the mantel display.

Do-it-yourself ideas: How to trim a tree, how to co-ordinate an open area or give new life to an old sideboard – the tour is chock full of fun ideas to take home and try. “People are going to see things they can do themselves,” said Caris. One example is using their existing colour scheme. “If you have a blue room, a red tree will not do,” said Caris.

Do some gift shopping with a bid on silent auction items: Support from the tour funds projects in the community and around the world, such as the clean water project in Cameroon, the Rotary Music Festival in St. Thomas, and the YMCA’s Strong Kids program.

[“source=TimeOFIndia”]